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It was great to chat with Sue Painter, The Confident Marketer, on her podcast about staying in business 5 years.

It was great to chat with Sue Painter, The Confident Marketer, on her podcast about staying in business 5 years.

A huge shout out of thanks to Sue Painter, the Confident Marketer, for interviewing me this week on the occasion of MarketingMel’s fifth year in business. Sue is a marketing and business coach and business coach for women whom I have known for several years. We have shared a couple of social media tribes together and have been reading each others blogs for quite awhile. Sue asked me for tips that have kept me going as well as some of the “big mistakes” I’ve learned from along the way in order for us to help her listeners including other entrepreneurs. One of my main tips for Sue: the importance of creating a business plan, an annual strategic plan and goal setting.

Here is the link to the podcast along with a special gift of the first four (brief) chapters of my upcoming e-book “88 Tips from a Marketing and PR Pro.”  Enjoy!

 

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By Sarah Kinsler and Mary Ellen Miller

The end of winter is in sight! Flowers are springing up in the South.

The end of winter is in sight! Flowers are springing up in the South.

Now that we’ve all moved our clocks ahead an hour and we’re enjoying the long evening hours, Spring is on it’s way.  We think we can speak for everyone who’s endured a harsh winter and say “Bring on the warm weather.” Here are a few tips to say goodbye to the wintertime blues:

1. Read a Good Book

Leadership guru John Maxwell says, “You are most like the books you read and people you associate with.” Head to your local bookstore and find a hidden treasure. Instead of reading or watching negative news before bed, indulge in something positive.

2. Try Something New

What better way to inspire yourself than stepping out of your comfort zone and trying something new? You just might discover a new hidden talent. Skydiving perhaps? Find yourself in the car a lot? Listen to more audio books.

3. Get Outside

The cold weather has kept us inside all winter. Take advantage of this sunshine and go on a picnic, hike a local trail or invite a long lost neighbor to go for a walk. Everyone benefits from vitamin D!

4. Say “Bye” to Negatives

Think happy, be happy. By eliminating the negative aspects in your life, you will find it easier to simply enjoy. This means everything from your thoughts to gossip to the friends you choose. Surround yourself with positive energy.

5. Set a Goal

January isn’t the only time for setting goals. Spring is the perfect time to review your 2014 strategic plan, correct course if needed, cross off the action items you’ve taken and maybe add a few goals if needed.

6. Spruce Up Your House (whether you plan to sell or not)

Check out MarketingMel’s client, award winning Buffalo Realtor Kim Addelman’s “Prepping for the Spring Marketing” Home Staging Tips on the StagedHomes.com blog. (We helped Kim land this great blog post and can do the same for your business!)

7. Keep Hydrated and Exercise Each Day

Now’s the time to get outside and ride a bike or go for a run. Remember to drink plenty of water (we’re even giving up some of our Diet Cokes in favor of H2O!)

Sarah Kinsler is a 2012 Public Relations graduate of ETSU. She loves vine, instagram, Pinterest and Diet Coke. She is an associate with MarketingMel. Mary Ellen Miller is the Founder and president of MarketingMel, an award winning public relations firm serving business professionals. 

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At Entrepreneurs Club with Dr. Andy Czuchry.

At Entrepreneurs’ Club with Dr. Andy Czuchry

Last evening I had the honor of returning to the classroom where I was an MBA student 13 years ago. Thanks to the magic of wimba (a college software program that  allows classroom “broadcasting” ) the Entrepreneurship Club at ETSU was seen live by students in Austria, Texas and Washington State.  Andy Czuchry, “Dr. C” as we all fondly called him, taught us many things about the real world of business. A real-life rocket scientist, he  combined theory and practice by bringing entrepreneurs to the classroom. They taught us the way things really are in the business world. One of Dr C’s favorite expressions is how I began my presentation: “An entrepreneur would rather work 80 hours a week for himself than 40 hours a week for someone else.” Anyone reading this who is an entrepreneur knows that to be true. But there is something incredibly exhilarating about the freedom that comes with being self employed that can’t be replicated. So we’re willing to tolerate the crazy hours because of that trade off.

Here are a few more tips I shared with the Entrepreneurs’ Club students:

Pitfalls:

You can’t do it all- You need to start making teams right away and joining forces with others. Work on what you do well and look for skill sets in others to compliment yours. It’s fine to start with virtual teams (for me it was twitter and some important tweet chat groups) but stay connected. No one can operate well as an island.

Don’t rely on third party hosts- Always host your own web site and put your videos on channels you host. I learned this the hard way after a multi-part series I created for WJHL-TV called “Social Media 101” literally vanished when they changed servers. I shudder when I watch some business people use Facebook as their personal web site. Facebook (and your product photos) could be gone tomorrow.

Create Systems-  I suggested the book the E-Myth Revisited by Michael Gerber to the group. This fascinating book points out the need to put systems into place no matter how small the company is. My current intern, Emma Brock, is developing the first-ever MarketingMel intern manual and Sarah Kinsler (who created the prezi and shared some of her MarketingMel experiences with the class) is creating an associates manual. I’m working on client intake systems.

Smart moves:

Know your personal mission as well as your company mission and vision and refer back to those often. They will direct your path.

Surround yourself with bright, young people (Both Sarah and Emma are a God-send to me)- They will keep you on your toes and give you energy.

Create an Advisory Board- This year I have six, sharp members of the community whom I trust to give me advice and to let me know if I have “broccoli in my teeth.”

Form business partnerships: I became a business partner with the Summit Leadership Foundation shortly after beginning my business. I give them a monthly contribution and then I am able to use their space without the overhead of a traditional office. Both organizations help each other out.

Set Goals and Plan Ahead: Throughout this month I’ll be working on my 2014 strategic plan. Some of those goals include: Following the Tennessee Performance Excellence Standards, becoming a certified “woman owned business” and publishing my E-book. My final thoughts were also words of wisdom from Dr. C. “Under-promise and over deliver” and “Be a lifelong learner.”  What’s on your Pitfalls and Smart moves lists?

 

 

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Joe Grenny with Mary Ellen of MarketingMel along with Roan Scholars Lucas Hitechew and Matthew Pencarinha.

Joe Grenny with Mary Ellen of MarketingMel and Roan Scholars Lucas Hitechew and Matthew Pencarinha.

I recently had the good fortune to hear best-selling author Joe Grenny speak on his latest book: Influencer: The New Science of Leading Change. Grenny said that “the most important capacity you possess is the ability to influence behavior- that of yourself or others.” He and his team studied top influencers around the world. He said what makes them stand apart from the rest of us comes down to three things:

1- They start with results. They ask the question: How will I measure success?

2- They look for the vital behaviors- What one or two behaviors will cause the greatest change?  Key influencers only want to change one, two or at most three behaviors.

3- They exert intentional influence- Influencers never see another person as having moral defects, being lazy or self-centered. Instead they see them in a moment of “moral slumber.” “Individual humans are capable of profoundly transforming their experience of almost any behavior by anchoring it to deeply held values,” said Grenny. “Put a face on it.”

He said that we hold meetings to influence behavior and he talked about the power of starting a meeting with this phrase” “Can I share an experience I recently had?”  and then telling a story that creates a vicarious experience for the listeners.

Interestingly he said that if you lead with incentives you undermine because people quickly learn to game the system. Grenny said leaders rehearse and invest in ability first through “deliberate practice.” First- become a teacher- then be a movtivator second. He used this video of a 10 year old girl heading down her first long ski jump.

Now that’s an inspiration! I bought the book Influencer and am already half way through it. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in change and influence. The Executive Briefing on “The New Science of Leading Change” was sponsored by Eastman Chemical Company and ETSU College of Business & Technology.

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Editor’s Note: Memorial Day marks the official beginning of summer and with it thoughts of summertime reading. The following is a guest blog by my friend and strategic planner, Rebecca Henderson. Rebecca is one of the most avid readers I know so who did I turn to for ideas for vacation reading? Rebecca, of course!  Please share your favorite summer reads with us in the comments section. 

 

Southern California beaches are a great place to read and relax.

Carlsbad Beach in Southern California is a great place to read and relax.

For about 25 years, around this time of year, I’ve been asked for book recommendations for vacation reading.  Loving to read as I do, it’s hard to pare a list down to just a few titles, while at the same time remembering  the interests of whomever is asking. I hope you’ll find at least one of these suggestions to your liking; I think their appeal is broad.

 

Carolyn Jourdan’s memoir,  Heart in the Right Place is one of the 25 books I’d take if I thought I’d be stranded on a desert island.  I’ve read it at least eight times.  The range of emotions Jourdan portrays have me crying tears of laughter and sadness. Another of Jourdan’s books,  Medicine Men: Extreme Appalachian Doctoring,  is another great read.

 

And Ladies of the Club by Helen Hooven Santmyer is a long novel, but worth the time, especially if you’re interested in small-town life from yesteryear or membership based organizations. I’ve enjoyed all of Nicholas Sparks books, as well as those by Richard Paul Evans.  The romantic Sparks novels are set in North Carolina.  The Evans works  are set more broadly and most are romantically inclined.  His Michael Vey novels are for youth, but also enjoyable for adults.

 

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, was nearly impossible for me to put down.  Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In  proved fascinating;  its appeal is especially to women in corporate environments.  To Lead is To Serve by Shar McBee is a quick, easy read, and the ideas put forth are terrific, yet timeless.  Don’t let the subtitle, “How to Attract Volunteers and Keep Them” fool you, because the book will be helpful in all walks of your life.

 

My mother  read cookbooks like some people read novels.  If this describes you,  you can’t go wrong with  a Southern Living or Taste of Home cookbook.  Any Junior League cookbook is sure to be a winner, too, as will most community cookbooks.

Happy reading!

Rebecca Henderson

Rebecca Henderson

Rebecca Henderson has an M.S. in Community Leadership from Duquesne University.  Rebecca loves strategic planning, organizational development, and “geeky things” like bylaws and parliamentary procedure.  Her company, Strategic Priorities Consulting, specializes in helping clients grow from where they are to where they want to go.  She is currently working on a book about being an effective leadership level community influencer. On a personal level, Rebecca is an active member of her church and Rotary Club, Vice Chair of the Girl Scout Council of the Southern Appalachians,  loves to read, and is “Mom” to her five Newfoundlands.

 

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